PHRASAL VERBS

Hi there,

Here is the material to prepare for the test on Phrasal Verbs.

GRAMMAR NOTES

VERBS LIST

EXERCISES

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“THE DESTRUCTORS” GLOSSARY

Hi grade 11A,

 

As promised, here’s the glossary you will prepare for the test on “The Destructors”.

 

You must comment this way:

 

After that Mike had kept his teeth tightly clamped except when the surprise was too great.

 

(The sentence where the word is found)

 

Clamp (v.) To fasten, grip, or support with or as if with a clamp.

 

(In this case, as the definition is not clear enough, you will need to complete it)

 

Clamp (n.) Any of various devices used to join, grip, support, or compress mechanical or structural parts

 

(So the final definition should be like this:)

 

Clamp (v.) To fasten, grip, or support with or as if with a device used to join, grip, support, or compress mechanical or structural parts

The text is HERE!

Here are the words and the people responsible for each.

 

Gaze ALVARADO PERDOMO, LAURA CAROLINA
Mockery ARENAS BUSTOS, ISABELLA
Ignoble BORDA PEÑA, MARIA JOSE
Blitz GALEANO HOYOS, MARÍA FERNANDA
Crippled GÓMEZ CUBILLOS, JULIANA
Common GOMEZ SALGADO, CAMILA
Pinched LASSO MUÑOZ, LAURA LORENA
Funk LÓPEZ PÉREZ, MARIA PAULA
Strolled MEDINA PARDO, MANUELA
Parodied MENDOZA DÍAZ, MARÍA ALEJANDRA
Hoot NEMPEQUE BENITEZ, NATALIA
Flicker OCHOA CALDERÓN, CAROLINA
Mudguard ORTIZ GÓMEZ, CAROLINA
Fickleness PARDO SALAZAR, VALENTINA
Chisel PEREA SILVA, VALENTINA
Strayed RODRÍGUEZ UCRÓS, ANGELA MARÍA
Lumbered ROJAS POLO, LAURA MARIA
Heaving SERRANO GUARÍN, MARÍA PAULA
Squatted VELOSA ZAMBRANO, VALENTINA
Hooey VILLARREAL HERNANDEZ, VALENTINA
Retched ZAFRA ZAMBRANO, MARIA FERNANDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Twentieth Century Test Preparation

Dear 11A,

 

Here’s what you have to do for the test on THURSDAY APRIL 28, 2016

 

Similarly as we did in class, you are going to be assigned a topic (events or facts) from the article about 20th century and you will have to:

 

  1. Tell the immediate effects the event or fact had in history.
  2. Explain the effects the event or fact had in late 20th century and early 21st
  3. Discuss other issues (a least one), which can be told about the event or fact.

 

YOUR PARTICIPATION IN THE BLOG GRANTS YOU 20 POINTS OF THE TEST GRADE.

 

Obviously, you have to research to enrich your topic, but you have to be brief; no more than 250 words. COPYING AND PASTING IS PENALIZED; YOU WILL AUTOMATICALLY LOSE YOUR TWENTY POINTS.

 

Remember! You benefit others and get benefitted by others. If you miss this assignment, you don’t only lose your 20 points, you might make someone else fail.

Student Topic
ALVARADO PERDOMO, LAURA CAROLINA U.S. enters WWI
ARENAS BUSTOS, ISABELLA  South Africa gets independence from Britain
BORDA PEÑA, MARIA JOSE Nigeria wins independence from England.
GALEANO HOYOS, MARÍA FERNANDA Darwin’s Origin of Species
GÓMEZ CUBILLOS, JULIANA Berlin Wall dismantled
GOMEZ SALGADO, CAMILA Assassination of Archduke Francis Ferdinand
LASSO MUÑOZ, LAURA LORENA Spread of English around the world.
LÓPEZ PÉREZ, MARIA PAULA Marx’s Das Kapital
MEDINA PARDO, MANUELA The League of Nations.
MENDOZA DÍAZ, MARÍA ALEJANDRA Picasso, John Millington Synge, Igor Stravinsky (book page 915)
NEMPEQUE BENITEZ, NATALIA WWII
OCHOA CALDERÓN, CAROLINA Royal tradition and scandal (book pages 914-915)
ORTIZ GÓMEZ, CAROLINA Soviet Union is dissolved.
PARDO SALAZAR, VALENTINA Freud’s The Interpretation of Dreams
PEREA SILVA, VALENTINA Fascism.
RODRÍGUEZ UCRÓS, ANGELA MARÍA Dropping of atomic bomb in Hiroshima.
ROJAS POLO, LAURA MARIA Joseph Conrad, Virginia Woolf, D.H. Lawrence (book page 916)
SERRANO GUARÍN, MARÍA PAULA End of conflict in Northern Ireland.
VELOSA ZAMBRANO, VALENTINA Joseph Stalin takes power
VILLARREAL HERNANDEZ, VALENTINA State of Israel created
ZAFRA ZAMBRANO, MARIA FERNANDA ENIAC is developed.

How Much Land Does a Man Need?

In order to study for the test, you will need to look up the meaning of all the unknown words you find. You will be allowed to use your glossary in the test, but on the conditions that it is handwritten and is not copied from anyone’s. I will check each of them and if there is one exactly like anyone else’s, she won’t be allowed to use it.

Here’s also the complete text of the story for you to read it.

HOW MUCH LAND DOES A MAN NEED text

11 grade term exams topics and resources

The Victorian Period

The Mark of the Beast

Transitional tags

transitional tags workshop

Embedded questions

EMBEDDED QUESTIONS

Embedded questions exercises

http://eslgrammarpractice.blogspot.com.co/2010/11/embeddedincluded-questions.html?m=1

 

MARK OF THE BEAST QUESTIONS

Here’s a weblink where you can read the story.

http://www.readbookonline.net/readOnLine/2420/

Here are the questions.

  1. What does the title suggest about the mood of the story?
  2. Read this fragment and tell what you think will happen in the story.

 

Your Gods and my Gods-do you or I know which are the stronger?

Native Proverb.

 

  1. Explain what is said in this paragraph.

 

EAST of Suez, some hold, the direct control of Providence ceases; Man being there handed over to the power of the Gods and Devils of Asia, and the Church of England Providence only exercising an occasional and modified supervision in the case of Englishmen.

 

  1. Summarize the fragment below.

 

My friend Strickland of the Police, who knows as much of natives of India as is good for any man, can bear witness to the facts of the case. Dumoise, our doctor, also saw what Strickland and I saw. The inference which he drew from the evidence was entirely incorrect. He is dead now; he died, in a rather curious manner, which has been elsewhere described.

 

  1. Who is Fleete?
  2. Summarize the text below

 

He rode in from his place in the hills to spend New Year in the station, and he stayed with Strickland. On New Year’s Eve there was a big dinner at the club, and the night was excusably wet. When men foregather from the uttermost ends of the Empire, they have a right to be riotous. The Frontier had sent down a contingent o’ Catch-’em-Alive-O’s who had not seen twenty white faces for a year, and were used to ride fifteen miles to dinner at the next Fort at the risk of a Khyberee bullet where their drinks should lie. They profited by their new security, for they tried to play pool with a curled-up hedgehog found in the garden, and one of them carried the marker round the room in his teeth. Half a dozen planters had come in from the south and were talking ‘horse’ to the Biggest Liar in Asia, who was trying to cap all their stories at once. Everybody was there, and there was a general closing up of ranks and taking stock of our losses in dead or disabled that had fallen during the past year. It was a very wet night, and I remember that we sang ‘Auld Lang Syne’ with our feet in the Polo Championship Cup, and our heads among the stars, and swore that we were all dear friends. Then some of us went away and annexed Burma, and some tried to open up the Soudan and were opened up by Fuzzies in that cruel scrub outside Suakim, and some found stars and medals, and some were married, which was bad, and some did other things which were worse, and the others of us stayed in our chains and strove to make money on insufficient experiences.

 

  1. What happened to Fleete in this text?

 

Fleete began the night with sherry and bitters, drank champagne steadily up to dessert, then raw, rasping Capri with all the strength of whisky, took Benedictine with his coffee, four or five whiskies and sodas to improve his pool strokes, beer and bones at half-past two, winding up with old brandy. Consequently, when he came out, at half-past three in the morning, into fourteen degrees of frost, he was very angry with his horse for coughing, and tried to leapfrog into the saddle. The horse broke away and went to his stables; so Strickland and I formed a Guard of Dishonour to take Fleete home.

 

  1. What did the narrator and Strickland see here?

 

Our road lay through the bazaar, close to a little temple of Hanuman, the Monkey-god, who is a leading divinity worthy of respect. All gods have good points, just as have all priests. Personally, I attach much importance to Hanuman, and am kind to his people–the great gray apes of the hills. One never knows when one may want a friend.

 

  1. Why was what Fleete do so serious?

 

There was a light in the temple, and as we passed, we could hear voices of men chanting hymns. In a native temple, the priests rise at all hours of the night to do honour to their god. Before we could stop him, Fleete dashed up the steps, patted two priests on the back, and was gravely grinding the ashes of his cigar-butt into the forehead of the red stone image of Hanuman. Strickland tried to drag him out, but he sat down and said solemnly:

 

‘Shee that? ‘Mark of the B-beasht! _I_ made it. Ishn’t it fine?’

 

  1. What happened after Fleete put out his cigarette on the monkey’s forehead?

 

In half a minute the temple was alive and noisy, and Strickland, who knew what came of polluting gods, said that things might occur. He, by virtue of his official position, long residence in the country, and weakness for going among the natives, was known to the priests and he felt unhappy. Fleete sat on the ground and refused to move. He said that ‘good old Hanuman’ made a very soft pillow.

 

Then, without any warning, a Silver Man came out of a recess behind the image of the god. He was perfectly naked in that bitter, bitter cold, and his body shone like frosted silver, for he was what the Bible calls ‘a leper as white as snow.’ Also he had no face, because he was a leper of some years’ standing and his disease was heavy upon him. We two stooped to haul Fleete up, and the temple was filling and filling with folk who seemed to spring from the earth, when the Silver Man ran in under our arms, making a noise exactly like the mewing of an otter, caught Fleete round the body and dropped his head on Fleete’s breast before we could wrench him away. Then he retired to a corner and sat mewing while the crowd blocked all the doors.

  1. Have the characters escaped without injury?

 

Strickland was very angry. He said that we might all three have been knifed, and that Fleete should thank his stars that he had escaped without injury.

 

 

  1. Was there really a slaughterhouse near their house?

 

Fleete thanked no one. He said that he wanted to go to bed. He was gorgeously drunk.

 

We moved on, Strickland silent and wrathful, until Fleete was taken with violent shivering fits and sweating. He said that the smells of the bazaar were overpowering, and he wondered why slaughter-houses were permitted so near English residences. ‘Can’t you smell the blood?’ said Fleete.

 

  1. Why do you suppose the narrator is “cold, depressed and unhappy”?

 

I said that the Managing Committee of the temple would in all probability bring a criminal action against us for insulting their religion. There was a section of the Indian Penal Code which exactly met Fleete’s offence. Strickland said he only hoped and prayed that they would do this. Before I left I looked into Fleete’s room, and saw him lying on his right side, scratching his left breast. Then. I went to bed cold, depressed, and unhappy, at seven o’clock in the morning.

 

  1. What unexpected behavior did Fleete have the following day? What was his condition?
  2. When the narrator and Strickland go to the stables, what do they notice in the horses? What causes the brutes’ behavior?
  3. What do the narrator and Strickland believe is Fleete’s behavior and the mark on his chest?
  4. When the narrator and Strickland go back to the house, why can’t they ride with Fleete?
  5. When they get back home, there were no lights. What unusual behavior does Fleete exhibit?
  6. Once they are inside the bungalow, how does Fleete look? What does he want to eat?
  7. What did they hear later in Fleete’s room? What did they discover and what did they do?
  8. After they tied and gagged Fleete, who do they call and what does he say?

PARADOX REPSONSE

Dear 11A,

 

Here are the definition of paradox, the two trailers you saw in class and the structure of the written response.

 

Remember you must write a response of at least 200 words.

 

PARADOX DEFINITION

 

something (such as a situation) that is made up of two opposite things and that seems impossible but is actually true or possible

 

someone who does two things that seem to be opposite to each other or who has qualities that are opposite

 

a statement that seems to say two opposite things but that may be true

 

TRAILERS

Branded

Elysium

 

Writing a Reaction or Response Essay

 

Reaction or response papers are usually requested by teachers so that you’ll consider carefully what you think or feel about something you’ve read. The following guidelines are intended to be used for reacting to a reading although they could easily be used for reactions to films too. Read whatever you’ve been asked to respond to, and while reading, think about the following questions.

 

How do you feel about what you are reading?

What do you agree or disagree with?

Can you identify with the situation?

What would be the best way to evaluate the story?

Keeping your responses to these questions in mind, follow the following prewriting steps.

 

Organizing Your Reaction Paper

 

A reaction/response paper has an introduction, a body, and a conclusion.

The introduction should contain all the basic information in one or two paragraphs.

 

Sentence 1: This sentence should give the title, author, and publication you read.
Sentence 2, 3, and sometimes 4: These sentences give a brief summary of what you read (nutshell)
Sentence 5: This sentence is your thesis statement. You agree, disagree, identify, or evaluate.

 

 

Your introduction should include a concise, one sentence, focused thesis. This is the focused statement of your reaction/response. More information on thesis statements is available.

The body should contain a paragraph that provides support for your thesis. The paragraph should contain one idea. Topic sentence should support the thesis, and the final sentence should lead into the conclusion.

 

Topic Sentence

 

detail — example –quotation –detail — example — quotation — detail — example — quotation — detail — example –quotation

 

Summary Sentence

 

The conclusion can be a restatement of what you said in your paper. It can also be a comment which focuses your overall reaction. Finally, it can be a prediction of the effects of what you’re reacting to. Note: your conclusion should include no new information.

Questions about the Victorian Era.

 

  1. What two kinds of growth did Britain undergo during the Victorian era?
  2. Which two classes of people gained new political power through the social and political changes of Victorian times?
  3. Why might Macaulay’s standards of progress be considered materialistic? What other kinds of progress could there be?
  4. Which of the economic and social problems of early Victorian society was NOT a direct result of industrialization?
  5. What are two reasons for decrease in the cost of living in Victorian England.
  6. What piece of legislation eliminated the requirement that only those who owned property could vote?
  7. In their attitude towards sex and the proper roles of men and women, what important social institution did the Victorian see themselves as defending?
  8. What was the effect of scientific advances on attitudes towards progress?
  9. Name three things that Victorian writers criticized in their society.
  10. What might Ruskin have meant by his characterization of smog as being “made of dead men souls”? Who are the dead men?
  11. How did the early Victorians resemble the romantics in their belief in the soul and their conception of the poet’s exalted role?
  12. How did late Victorian writers differ from the early Victorians in their view of the world?
  13. If writing that was critical to Victorian society did not make their readers change their lives, what purpose might the criticism have had?

IELTS TASK 2 TUTORIAL