LIFE ON THE MISSISSIPPI GLOSSARY 9A

Hi grade 9A,

 

As promised, here’s the glossary you will prepare for the test on “Life on the Mississippi”.

You must comment this way:

The sentence where the word is found.

AT the end of what seemed a tedious while, I had managed to pack my head full of islands, towns, bars, “points,” and bends

 

The definition and the grammar category it belongs to

tedious (adj.) Tiresome by reason of length, slowness, or dullness; boring.

Your participation in the blog is worth 20 points of the test.

The text is HERE!

Here are the words and the people responsible for each.

Complacency CAMARGO GONZÁLEZ, DULCE ANA MARÍA
Trifle CURREA ALONSO, KATIA PATRICIA
Fetch FLOREZ ORREGO, JULIANA
Breach GAMA GUTIERREZ, VALENTINA
Appalled GAMBOA MAHECHA, LAURA ALEJANDRA
Sliver GOMEZ ACOSTA, MARIA JOSE
Knotty GUERRERO LEÓN, SARA JULIANA
Eddy JIMENEZ MONSALVE, MARIA DE LA O
Astounded LÓPEZ FARFÁN, LUISA DANIELA
Uttered LÓPEZ PÉREZ, PAOLA ALEJANDRA
Reperusal MACALLISTER ORTIZ, MARÍA ANDREA
Dimple NEIRA LOPEZ, MARIANA
Wreck PARADA GARCÍA, VALERIA
Hideous PLASCENCIA VILLABONA, DANIELA
Hue RINCON BERNARD, VALENTINA
Ruddy SALCEDO MARENTES, VALENTINA
Bough SALCEDO TORRES, MARIA CAMILA
Drifted SILVA ARIZA, ANA VALENTINA
Wrought VARGAS SUÁREZ, MARÍA JOSÉ
Slick VELASCO BORDA, JULIANA MARGARITA

 

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42 Comments

  1. María José Vargas

     /  May 10, 2016

    Wrought: (v.) A past tense and a past participle of work.
    (adj.) 1. Put together; created
    2. Shaped by hammering with tools. Used chiefly of metals or metalwork.
    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/wrought

    Sentence:
    In this semester I will have a very good grade in english because, I wrought very complete plan so, I can pass with a good grade all of the exams and projects that the teacher assign us.

    Reply
    • Thank you Mayito. 😐 The definition is good though you were not supposed to invent a sentence but to copy and paste the sentence in the story that HAS the word.

      But as I have said, a day came when I began to cease from noting
      the glories and the charms which the moon and the sun and the twilight wrought upon the river’s face

      Reply
  2. Maria

     /  May 10, 2016

    You are well up on the bar now; there is a bar under every point, because the water that comes down around it forms an “eddy” and allows the sediment to sink.

    Eddy : ( substantive) A circular movement of water, counter to a main current, causing a small whirlpool.

    Reply
    • Good Maria 🙂

      Though the word substantive is not frequently used anymore. However, don’t correct anything. It is clear it is a noun.

      Reply
  3. Maria Camila Salcedo

     /  May 10, 2016

    ”A clean-stemmed dead tree waved a single leafy bough that glowed like a flame in the
    unobstructed splendor that was flowing from the sun”

    Bough (noun): A tree branch, especially a large or main branch.
    Synonyms: branch,limb,arm.
    Example
    ”The willows dipped their boughs into the river.”

    Reply
  4. valentina gama

     /  May 10, 2016

    But Mr. W. came on watch full twelve minutes late on this particular night- a tremendous breach of etiquette; in fact, it is the unpardonable sin among pilots.

    breach:(noun) an infraction or violation, as of a law, trust, faith, or promise.

    Reply
  5. sara guerrero

     /  May 10, 2016

    knotty: (adj.) involved, intricate or difficult.
    sentence: “I never could more than get one knotty thing learned before another presented itself.”

    Reply
  6. paola lopez

     /  May 10, 2016

    a book that was a dead language to the uneducated passenger, but which told its mind to
    me without reserve, delivering its most cherished secrets as clearly as if it uttered them with a voice.

    utter(verb): to give audible expression to; speak or pronounce.

    Reply
  7. Juliana Velasco

     /  May 11, 2016

    Don’t you crowd that slick, greasy-looking place; there ain’t nine feet there; she won’t stand it.
    Slick: (adj) : very smooth and slippery

    Reply
  8. Valentina Salcedo

     /  May 11, 2016

    ” Where the ruddy flush was faintest, was a smooth spot that was covered with graceful circles ”
    Ruddy (Adj): red or reddish

    Reply
  9. Appelled – (adj):Shocked; Horrified
    ” I was appalled; it was a villainous night for
    blackness, we were in a particularly wide and blind part of the river, where there was no shape or
    substance to anything, and it seemed incredible that Mr. Bixby should have left that poor fellow to kill the
    boat, trying to find out where he was.”

    Reply
  10. Dulce Ana María Camargo

     /  May 12, 2016

    Complacency: (noun) a feeling of security while unaware of unpleasant possibilities;
    self-satisfaction.
    Example: “But my complacency could hardly get start enough to lift my nose a trifle in to the air” (Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi, pg 453).

    Reply
  11. María José Gómez

     /  May 12, 2016

    Silver: Resembling silver, especially in having a lustrous shine; silvery.

    That silver streak in the shadow of
    the forest is the ‘break’ from a new snag, and he has located himself in the very best place he could have
    found to fish for steamboats; that tall dead tree

    Reply
  12. Luisa Daniela López

     /  May 12, 2016

    Astounded:
    verb:
    to overwhelm with amazement; astonish.

    Sentence:
    So in blind desperation, I started such a rattling “shivaree” down below as never had astounded an engineer in this world before, I fancy.

    Reply
  13. katia

     /  May 12, 2016

    trifle: (n) a matter or item of little value or importance
    example :but of course my complacency could hardly get start enough to lift my nose a trifle into the air

    Reply
  14. Valeria Parada

     /  May 12, 2016

    Wreck: Noun
    a building, structure, or object that has been reduced, destroyed, or greatly damaged.

    “But to the pilot that was an italicized passage; indeed, it was more than that, it was a legend of the largest capitals, with a string of shouting exclamation-points at the end of it, for it meant that a wreck or a rock was buried there that could tear the life out of the strongest vessel that ever floated.”

    Reply
  15. Mariana Neira

     /  May 12, 2016

    Definition: (Noun) A small natural indentation in the flesh on a part of the human body, especially in the cheek or on the chin.

    Sentence: The passenger who could not read it was charmed with a peculiar sort of faint dimple on its surface.

    Reply
  16. “But of course my complacency could hardly get start enough to lift my nose a trifle into the air, before Mr. Bixby would think of something to fetch it down again.”

    Fetch: (v) Go for and then bring back. (Oxford online dictionaries)

    Reply
  17. Marìa Andrea

     /  May 12, 2016

    Reperusal is a noun, it means a fresh or renewed perusal. A perusal is also a noun and it means a reading.
    In the text this word is found on the sentence:
    “There never was so wonderful a book written by man; never one whose interest was so absorbing, so unflagging, so sparklingly renewed with every reperusal.”

    Reply
  18. María José G

     /  May 12, 2016

    Sliver:A small narrow piece, portion.
    I’ll have a misunderstanding with a snag that would
    snatch the keelson out of this steamboat as neatly as if it were a sliver in your hand.

    Reply
  19. Definition: (Noun) A gradation or shade of a color; tint.

    Sentence: “In the middle distance the red hue brightened into gold, through which a solitary log came floating, black and conspicuous”

    Reply
  20. Daniela Plascencia

     /  May 12, 2016

    Hideous: (adjective) horrible or frightful to the senses; repulsive; very ugly.
    ” it is the faintest and simplest expression the water ever makes, and the most “hideous” to a pilots eye ”
    example- When he was in the woods, he saw a hideous creature.

    Reply
  21. Ana Valentina

     /  May 12, 2016

    “soft distances; and over the whole scene, far and near, the dissolving lights drifted steadily, enriching it every passing moment with new marvels of coloring.”

    Drifted: to be carried along by or as if by currents of air or water or (of a current) to carry (a vessel, etc) a long. (Float on water)

    Reply

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