RESEARCH PROJECT GRADE 10

These are the instructions and grading criteria for your research project.

Choose one of the following.

  • Greek heroes (Hercules, Achilles, Odysseus, Jason)
  • King Arthur and The Holy Grail
  • Ramayana: Hindu Epic
  • Polynesian hero: Rupe
  • Gilgamesh
  • Irish Hero: Fionn mac Cumhaill
  • Chinese mythology: Yi

Instructions

1. You must paraphrase the hero’s story.
2. You must describe his traits and deeds.
3. You must explain how this hero embodies the ideals of a community.
4. You must explain why the analyzed story was and is of cultural importance to its country of origin.
5, You must reach conclusions behind the universality of Epic.

Delivery must meet the following criteria:

1. All presentations must include:
a. PPT, Prezi, or Video presentation.
b. The document must include:
-abstract
-objectives
-hypothesis
-justification
-theoretical framework
-analysis of literary text/myth/legend
-conclusions
-bibliography
c. A copy of the Abstract should be given to Ss.

The writing section cannot exceed two pages of content.

The Document will be evaluated with the Writing Rubrics. It will be the 50% of the final grade.

The presentation will be the other 50% of the final grade. It will be evaluated as follows:

10% creativity
20% language use
30% content
30% speaking skills (intonation, pronunciation, fluency, pitch)
10% presenting skills (body language, eye contact, volume, clarity, proper use of visual aids).

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KENNING AND ALLITERATION DISCUSSION 10B

Hello ladies,

Here’s the space for your discussion about Kenning and Alliteration.

First, you must comment with your kenning and alliteration examples. Then, each of you has to comment to at least another students, agreeing or disagreeing on what she posted.

The instruction is like this:

5. Read the following text and answer the questions given at its conclusion:

Alliteration and kennings are devices used frequently in Anglo-Saxon poetry.
Alliteration is the repetition of the same initial sound (usually a consonant) to create a unifying sound effect or enhance a description.
A kenning is a special kind of metaphor that uses compound words, prepositional phrases, or possessives to modify or indirectly name a character or thing.

a. Re-read lines 432–448 of Beowulf, in which Beowulf fights with Grendel. List two examples each of alliteration and kennings from the passage, and explain what each indicates or means to suggest.

The Battle with Grendel

http://www.nexuslearning.net/books/Elements_of_Lit_Course6/Anglo_Saxon_Period/Th

Alliteration
1.

2.
Kennings
3.

4.

KENNING AND ALLITERATION DISCUSSION 10A

Hello ladies,

Here’s the space for your discussion about Kenning and Alliteration.

First, you must comment with your kenning and alliteration examples. Then, each of you has to comment to at least another students, agreeing or disagreeing on what she posted.

The instruction is like this:

5. Read the following text and answer the questions given at its conclusion:

Alliteration and kennings are devices used frequently in Anglo-Saxon poetry.
Alliteration is the repetition of the same initial sound (usually a consonant) to create a unifying sound effect or enhance a description.
A kenning is a special kind of metaphor that uses compound words, prepositional phrases, or possessives to modify or indirectly name a character or thing.

a. Re-read lines 432–448 of Beowulf, in which Beowulf fights with Grendel. List two examples each of alliteration and kennings from the passage, and explain what each indicates or means to suggest.

The Battle with Grendel

http://www.nexuslearning.net/books/Elements_of_Lit_Course6/Anglo_Saxon_Period/Th

Alliteration
1.

2.
Kennings
3.

4.

Beowulf text

The Monster Grendel

http://www.nexuslearning.net/books/Elements_of_Lit_Course6/Anglo_Saxon_Period/The%20Monster%20Grendel.htm

The arrival of the hero

http://www.nexuslearning.net/books/Elements_of_Lit_Course6/Anglo_Saxon_Period/The%20Arrival.htm

Unferth’s Challenge

http://www.nexuslearning.net/books/Elements_of_Lit_Course6/Anglo_Saxon_Period/Unferths%20Challenge.htm

The Battle with Grendel 

http://www.nexuslearning.net/books/Elements_of_Lit_Course6/Anglo_Saxon_Period/The%20Battle.htm

The Monster’s Mother

http://www.nexuslearning.net/books/Elements_of_Lit_Course6/Anglo_Saxon_Period/The%20Monsters%20Mother.htm

The Final Battle

http://www.nexuslearning.net/books/Elements_of_Lit_Course6/Anglo_Saxon_Period/Final%20Battle.htm

Glossary Beowulf

Grade 10 ladies,

Here’s the glossay for the words worked as HW in 10C and classwork for 10A and B.

This is for you to confirm and/or correct.

1. scop – composers and storytellers of Anglo-Saxon poetry
2. moor – n. A broad area of open land, often high but poorly drained.
3. gables – decorative triangular-shaped roofing structures
4. wergild – a fine paid to the relatives of a murdered person to free the offender from further obligations or punishment.
5. linden – soft light wood
6. mead – an alcoholic drink of fermented honey and water
7. vexed – irritated, annoyed
8. gorges – eats greedily
9. sentinel – a person or thing that stands watch
10. talons – claws
11. sinews – tendons
12. hoary – gray or white with age
13. pyre – a bonfire for burning a dead body
14. hoard – a hidden or carefully guarded supply or accumulation of valuables
15. scabbard – a sheath for a sword
16. runic – consisting or set down in an ancient alphabet used for writing Germanic script, especially in Germanic languages,
most often of Scandinavia and Britain from about the third to thirteenth centuries
17. solace – to console or cheer
18. niggardly – reluctant to give or spend, stingy
19. skulked – moved stealthily
20. scruples – morals or ethical considerations that restrain one’s behavior and inhibits certain actions

A NARRATIVE OF THE CAPTIVITY

Grade 9 ladies,

Here you find the complete text of “A Narrative of the Captivity”

 

from A Narrative of Captivity
Mary Rowlandson

The morning being come, they prepared to go on their way. One of the Indians got up upon a horse, and they set me up behind him, with my poor sick babe in my lap. A very wearisome and tedious day I had of it; what with my own wound, and my child’s being so exceeding sick, and in a lamentable condition with her wound. It may be easily judged what a poor feeble condition we were in, there being not the least crumb of refreshing that came within either of our mouths from Wednesday night to Saturday night, except only a little cold water. This day in the afternoon, about an hour by sun, we came to the place where they intended, viz. an Indian town, called Wenimesset, norward of Quabaug. . . . I sat much alone with a poor wounded child in my lap, which moaned night and day, having nothing to revive the body, or cheer the spirits of her, but instead of that, sometimes one Indian would come and tell me one hour, that your master will knock your child in the head, and then a second, and then a third, your master will quickly knock your child in the head.

This was the comfort I had from them, miserable comforters are ye all, as he said. Thus nine days I sat upon my knees, with my babe in my lap, till my flesh was raw again; my child being even ready to depart this sorrowful world, they bade me carry it out to another wigwam (I suppose because they would not be troubled with such spectacles) whither I went with a very heavy heart, and down I sat with the picture of death in my lap. About two hours in the night, my sweet babe like a lamb departed this life, on February 18, 1675. It being about six years and five months old. It was nine days from the first wounding, in this miserable condition, without any refreshing of one nature or another, except a little cold water. I cannot but take notice, how at another time I could not bear to be in the room where any dead person was, but now the case is changed; I must and could lie down by my dead babe, side by side all the night after. I have thought since of the wonderful goodness of God to me, in preserving me in the use of my reason and senses, in that distressed time, that I did not use wicked and violent means to end my own miserable life. In the morning, when they understood that my child was dead they sent for me home to my master’s wigwam: (by my master in this writing, must be understood Quanopin, who was a Sagamore, and married King Philip’s wife’s sister; not that he first took me, but I was sold to him by another Narragansett Indian, who took me when first I came out of the garrison). I went to take up my dead child in my arms to carry it with me, but they bid me let it alone: There was no resisting, but go I must and leave it. When I had been at my master’s wigwam, I took the first opportunity I could get, to go look after my dead child: When I came I asked them what they had done with it. Then they told me it was upon the hill: Then they went and showed me where it was, where I saw the ground was newly digged, and there they told me they had buried it: There I left that child in the wilderness, and must commit it, and myself also in this wilderness condition, to him who is above all. God having taken away this dear child, I went to see my daughter Mary, who was at this same Indian town, at a wigwam not very far off, though we had little liberty or opportunity to see one another. She was about ten years old, and taken from the door at first by a Praying Ind. and afterward sold for a gun. When I came in sight, she would fall aweeping; at which they were provoked, and would not let me come near her, but bade me be gone; which was a heart-cutting word to me. I had one child dead, another in the wilderness, I knew not where, the third they would not let me come near to: “Me (as he said) have ye bereaved of my Children, Joseph is not, and Simeon is not, and ye will take Benjamin also, all these things are against me.” I could not sit still in this condition, but kept walking from one place to another. And as I was going along, my heart was even overwhelmed with the thoughts of my condition, and that I should have children, and a nation which I knew not ruled over them. Whereupon I earnestly entreated the Lord, that He would consider my low estate, and show me a token for good, and if it were His blessed will, some sign and hope of some relief. And indeed quickly the Lord answered, in some measure, my poor prayers: For as I was going up and down mourning and lamenting my condition, my son came to me, and asked me how I did; I had not seen him before, since the destruction of the town, and I knew not where he was, till I was informed by himself, that he was amongst a smaller parcel of Indians, whose place was about six miles off; with tears in his eyes, he asked me whether his sister Sarah was dead; and told me he had seen his sister Mary; and prayed me, that I would not be troubled in reference to himself. . . . I cannot but take notice of the wonderful mercy of God to me in those afflictions, in sending me a Bible. One of the Indians that came from Medfield fight, had brought some plunder, came to me, and asked me, if I would have a Bible, he had got one in his basket. I was glad of it, and asked him, whether he thought the Indians would let me read. He answered, yes: So I took the Bible, and in that melancholy time, it came into my mind to read first the 28th chapter of Deuteronomy, which I did, and when I had read it, my dark heart wrought on this manner, that there was no mercy for me, that the blessings were gone, and the curses come in their room, and that I had lost my opportunity. But the Lord helped me still to go on reading till I came to Chapter 30 the seven first verses, where I found, there was mercy promised again, if we would return to Him by repentance; and though we were scattered from one end of the earth to the other, yet the Lord would gather us together, and turn all those curses upon our enemies. I do not desire to live to forget this Scripture, and what comfort it was to me. . . .

The Fifth Remove

The occasion (as I thought) of their moving at this time, was, the English Army, it being near and following them: For they went, as if they had gone for their lives, for some considerable way, and then they made a stop, and chose some of their stoutest men, and sent them back to hold the English Army in play while the rest escaped: And then, like Jehu, they marched on furiously, with their old, and with their young: Some carried their old decrepit mothers, some carried one, and some another. Four of them carried a great Indian upon a bier; but going through a thick wood with him, they were hindered, and could make no haste; whereupon they took him upon their backs, and carried him, one at a time, till they came to Bacquaug River. Upon a Friday, a little after noon we came to this river. When all the company was come up, and were gathered together, I thought to count the number of them, but they were so many, and being somewhat in motion, it was beyond my skill. In this travel, because of my wound, I was somewhat favored in my load; I carried only my knitting work and two quarts of parched meal: Being very faint I asked my mistress to give me one spoonful of the meal, but she would not give me a taste. They quickly fell to cutting dry trees, to make rafts to carry them over the river: and soon my turn came to go over: By the advantage of some brush which they had laid upon the raft to sit upon, I did not wet my foot (which many of themselves at the other end were mid-leg deep) which cannot but be acknowledged as a favor of God to my weakened body, it being a very cold time. I was not before acquainted with such kind of doings or dangers. “When thou passeth through the waters I will be with thee, and through the Rivers they shall not overflow thee,” Isaiah, 43:2. A certain number of us got over the river that night, but it was the night after the Sabbath before all the company was got over. On the Saturday they boiled an old horse’s leg which they had got, and so we drank of the broth, as soon as they thought it was ready, and when it was almost gone, they filled it up again.

The first week of my being among them, I hardly ate anything; the second week, I found my stomach grow very faint for want of something; and yet it was very hard to get down their filthy trash: but the third week, though I could think how formerly my stomach would turn against this or that, and I could starve and die before I could eat such things, yet they were sweet and savory to my taste. . . .
The Sixth Remove

We traveled on till night; and in the morning, we must go over the river to Philip’s crew. When I was in the canoe, I could not but be amazed at the numerous crew of pagans that were on the bank on the other side. When I came ashore, they gathered all about me, I sitting alone in the midst: I observed they asked one another questions, and laughed, and rejoiced over their gains and victories. Then my heart began to fail: And I fell aweeping which was the first time to my remembrance, that I wept before them. Although I had met with so much affliction, and my heart was many times ready to break, yet could I not shed one tear in their sight: but rather had been all this while in a maze, and like one astonished: But now I may say as, Psalm 137:1, “By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down: yea, we wept when we remembered Zion.” There one of them asked me, why I wept, I could hardly tell what to say: Yet I answered, they would kill me: “No,” said he, “none will hurt you.” Then came one of them and gave me two spoonfuls of meal to comfort me, and another gave me half a pint of peas; which was more worth than many bushels at another time. Then I went to see King Philip, he bade me come in and sit down, and asked me whether I would smoke it (a usual compliment nowadays amongst saints and sinners) but this no way suited me. For though I had formerly used tobacco, yet I had left it ever since I was first taken. It seems to be a bait, the devil lays to make men lose their precious time: I remember with shame, how formerly, when I had taken two or three pipes, I was presently ready for another, such a bewitching thing it is: But I thank God, He has now given me power over it; surely there are many who may be better employed than to lie sucking a stinking tobacco pipe.

Now the Indians gather their forces to go against North Hampton: Overnight one went about yelling and hooting to give notice of the design. Whereupon they fell to boiling of groundnuts, and parching of corn (as many as had it) for their provision: And in the morning away they went. During my abode in this place, Philip spoke to me to make a shirt for his boy, which I did, for which he gave me a shilling: I offered the money to my master, but he bade me keep it: And with it I bought a piece of horseflesh. Afterward he asked me to make a cap for his boy, for which he invited me to dinner. I went, and he gave me a pancake, about as big as two fingers; it was made of parched wheat, beaten, and fried in bear’s grease, but I thought I never tasted pleasanter meat in my life. There was a squaw who spoke to me to make a shirt for her sannup, for which she gave me a piece of bear. Another asked me to knit a pair of stockings, for which she gave me a quart of peas: I boiled my peas and bear together, and invited my master and mistress to dinner, but the proud gossip, because I served them both in one dish, would eat nothing, except one bit that he gave her upon the point of his knife. . . .

The Move to the Ashuelot Valley, New Hampshire

But instead of going either to Albany or homeward, we must go five miles up the river, and then go over it. Here we abode awhile. Here lived a sorry Indian, who spoke to me to make him a shirt. When I had done it, he would pay me nothing. But he living by the riverside, where I often went to fetch water, I would often be putting of him in mind, and calling for my pay: At last he told me if I would make another shirt, for a papoose not yet born, he would give me a knife, which he did when I had done it. I carried the knife in, and my master asked me to give it him, and I was not a little glad that I had anything that they would accept of, and be pleased with. When we were at this place, my master’s maid came home, she had been gone three weeks into the Narragansett country, to fetch corn, where they had stored up some in the ground: She brought home about a peck and half of corn. This was about the time that their great captain, Naananto, was killed in the Narragansett country. My son being now about a mile from me, I asked liberty to go and see him, they bade me go, and away I went: but quickly lost myself, traveling over hills and through swamps, and could not find the way to him. And I cannot but admire at the wonderful power and goodness of God to me, in that, though I was gone from home, and met with all sorts of Indians, and those I had no knowledge of, and there being no Christian soul near me; yet not one of them offered the least imaginable miscarriage to me. I turned homeward again, and met with my master, he showed me the way to my son. . . .

But I was fain to go and look after something to satisfy my hunger, and going among the wigwams, I went into one, and there found a squaw who showed herself very kind to me, and gave me a piece of bear. I put it into my pocket, and came home, but could not find an opportunity to broil it, for fear they would get it from me, and there it lay all that day and night in my stinking pocket. In the morning I went to the same squaw, who had a kettle of groundnuts boiling; I asked her to let me boil my piece of bear in her kettle, which she did, and gave me some groundnuts to eat with it: And I cannot but think how pleasant it was to me. I have sometime seen bear baked very handsomely among the English, and some like it, but the thoughts that it was bear, made me tremble: But now that was savory to me that one would think was enough to turn the stomach of a brute creature.

One bitter cold day, I could find no room to sit down before the fire: I went out, and could not tell what to do, but I went in to another wigwam, where they were also sitting round the fire, but the squaw laid a skin for me, and bid me sit down, and gave me some groundnuts, and bade me come again: and told me they would buy me, if they were able, and yet these were strangers to me that I never saw before. . . .

Sentences in context Beowulf Glossary 10B

Hi 10B girls,

This sentences MUST be in your notebooks.

These are the missing sentences to complete from the exercise we started last week.

Complete the sentences with the most suitable word from the glossary.

8. Tradition said that this house with the pointed ___________________was inhabited, in the time of Henry III.

9. Even what in that room ____________________ me and inconvenience me now looms in a purified light, and figures in my imagination as a thing to be desired.

10. The common drink of the Abyssins is beer and __________________ , which they drink to excess when they visit one another.

11. A single stroke of the heavy blade and then the corpse to the flaming ________________ without.

12. What had become of the dazzling _____________________ of royal jewels exhibited at every close of day?

13. He ______________________about the wharves of Joppa, and seeks a ship that’s bound for Tarshish.

14. This more reverent title had previously been forced upon him by the religious _________________of the last newspaper in which a part of the work had appeared.

15. I noticed his hands, dirty, with long nails; they were merely bone and ________________, large and strong; but I had forgotten that they were so shapely.

16. So Hrothgar’s men lived happy in his hall Till the monster stirred, that demon, that fiend, Grendel, who haunted the _________________________

17. Through this window shone a mild light which silvered the foliage of two or three ________________________ trees which formed a group outside the park.

18. He took all the money and ____________________ kept it all for himself.

19. He put out a strangely distorted _____________________  and gripped my fingers.

20. Beware, those who are thrust into danger, clutched at by trouble, yet can carry no ___________________.

ALLUSION VIDEOS GRADE 9

HI GRADE 9 LADIES,
These are the two videos which you need to see for class. Watch them and answer the questions below.

 

1. This is a scene from Star Wars: The Empire Strikes back” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h6sj89xgnl4

2. And this is a scene from Toy story 2

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aMK9vXuN-Cc&feature=related

 

What is the allusion portrayed in Toy Story?

What do you suppose was Toy Story’s producers intention to place this allusion in the movie?

VIDEOS 10B

WATCH THESE VIDEOS AND WRITE A SUMMARY USING SENTENCES, CLAUSES, PHRASES AND CORRECT PUNCTUATION.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R3hjjaUQiVA

http://vimeo.com/7350508

10A Beowulf summary lines 1- 93

Laura R, Daniela O

PLEASE DO NOT FORGET TO INCLUDE VOCABULARY!

10A Beowulf summary lines 93 – 189

Sara, Manuela

PLEASE DO NOT FORGET TO INCLUDE VOCABULARY!

10A Beowulf summary lines 190 -281

Laura A, Camila P

PLEASE DO NOT FORGET TO INCLUDE VOCABULARY!

10A Beowulf summary lines 281 – 372

Catalina O, Paula M.

PLEASE DO NOT FORGET TO INCLUDE VOCABULARY!

10A Beowulf summary lines 373 – 472

Natalia, Margarita B.

PLEASE DO NOT FORGET TO INCLUDE VOCABULARY!

10A Beowulf summary lines 472 -569

Silvana, Ximena

PLEASE DO NOT FORGET TO INCLUDE VOCABULARY!

10A Beowulf summary lines 570 – 665

Daniela A, Margarita G

PLEASE DO NOT FORGET TO INCLUDE VOCABULARY!

10A Beowulf summary lines 666 – 760

Laura G, Valeria

PLEASE DO NOT FORGET TO INCLUDE VOCABULARY!

10A Beowulf summary lines 761 – end.

Cata E, Camila C.

PLEASE DO NOT FORGET TO INCLUDE VOCABULARY!

10B Beowulf summary lines 104-185

Responsible:

Lau Corredor, Lau Castro

10B Beowulf summary lines 186-265

Responsible:

Ma. Luisa, Ma Alejandra Gutierrez

10B Beowulf summary lines 265-343

Responsible:

Paula, Maria Ale Guzmán

10B Beowulf summary lines 344-431

Responsible:
Ana, Daniela O.

10B Beowulf summary lines 433-504

Responsible:

Delly, Jimena

10B Beowulf summary lines 505-588

Responsible:

Vanessa, Mariana

10B Beowulf summary lines 588-671

Responsible:

Lau Prieto, Ale P

 

10B Beowulf summary lines 671 -751

Responsible:

Clau, Luisa.

10B Beowulf summary lines 752~end

Responsible: Vale Hernandez, Dani Perez, Ma Paula V.

Epic

Hello grade 10 students, This is a very complete definition of Epic and the epic hero.
You must print it and have it in your notebooks as both Oscar and Juan Pablo will be using it along the term.

Epic. An extended narrative poem recounting actions, travels, adventures, and heroic episodes and written in a high style (with ennobled diction, for example). It may be written in hexameter verse, especially dactylic hexameter, and it may have twelve books or twenty four books.

Characteristics of the classical epic include these:

The main character or protagonist is heroically larger than life, often the source and subject of legend or a national hero

The deeds of the hero are presented without favoritism, revealing his failings as well as his virtues

The action, often in battle, reveals the more-than-human strength of the heroes as they engage in acts of heroism and courage

The setting covers several nations, the whole world, or even the universe

The episodes, even though they may be fictional, provide an explanation for some of the circumstances or events in the history of a nation or people

The gods and lesser divinities play an active role in the outcome of actions

All of the various adventures form an organic whole, where each event relates in some way to the central theme